Testimonials

Mantus With Mud 640x479

Testimonials

Cruising Community Using Mantus

An email from a customer

Hello

Meant to email you sooner, but just haven’t taken the time. We bought our Mantus anchor 35# late last summer, but didn’t get to use it till November.  The anchor has been wonderful and definitely the right replacement from our plow. Maybe we’re not anchoring out enough, but our Mantus has set the first time every time we’ve used it and held all night long. You have a great product and the anchor combined with your hook and bridle system is the perfect system for us. Good luck in the years ahead.

Bob Schlobohm
9 Lives

Yet Another Mantus Report

Mantus Anchor
After over 60,000 miles of cruising and anchoring 2 or 3 times a week using a combination of a 45lb CQR and a 45lb Danforth anchors with 80 feet each of 3/8″ chain backed up by 100 ft each of 1″ nylon rode, we decided to re-evaluate our ground tackle on Sampatecho II. It wasn’t that we were dragging with any regularity, although we had on occasion and it wasn’t that the 400 lbs on the bow hurt our performance severely although we did ride a little bow-heavy and “stuff” more big seas than I like. Ultimately, it just came down to placing more value on a good night’s sleep with fewer anchor-watches and midnight re-sets.
So, a little over a year ago, the search for a new anchor began. Like any other cruiser, I began reading magazine articles, surfing the Internet, checking out boat show exhibits and seriously talking to other boaters. You would think that boaters would be the best source of reliable information but I soon discovered that ground tackle runs a close third to politics and religion when it comes to subjectivity. Even the guy with a bucket of rocks thinks he has “the ultimate anchor”! From our own experience, we were ruling out the traditional anchors; Bruce, Danforth, CQR and Delta which, when properly set, are good in many conditions but definitely not ALL conditions.
We’re searching for the Holy Grail of anchors which would set immediately in sand, mud, marle, rocks, gravel and kelp, hold with 5:1 scope through gale force winds and re-set just as quickly should the tidal current reverse and pull in the opposite direction. It took about 4 months but we narrowed the field down to 5 contenders; Rockna, Spade, Manson and Mantus. I had some experience with each of these from deliveries or friends’ boats and all had worked faultlessly in my limited use. Each had “independent” testing to prove their supremacy and each had design differences to point to as their secret to success. The next 8 moths would determine which one was right for us.
Manson was the first to fall under scrutiny. The slotted shank may have some benefit in retrieval but my fear is that it could also dislodge the anchor in a reversing tidal current and weaken the shank in lateral forces when anchored in rock.
The Spade was next to fall because it lacked a roll bar to get it upright in all conditions especially soupy mud. It’s shape was great for biting into all surfaces but I feared that the lack of “righting ability” could be a problem in reversing current when a scoop full of goo could just ride along on top of the shank as we’d witnessed with Deltas. Lack of a retrieval mechanism in the event of fouling on cables, chains etc was also a concern.
Rockna had been my early favorite; used by such notables as Nigel Calder and the first to introduce the “roll bar” to orient the base quickly and effectively, I still believe it a great anchor and would recommend it heartily. It sets quickly, holds well and re-sets quickly too. It would be my choice except for the ultimate selection that we discovered thanks to two new cruisers from Texas on our old “buddy-boat” Our Way.
Mantus was developed not by an engineer but a doctor who was also a boater who borrowed from existing technology to produce the anchor of our dreams.  It too has a roll bar to orient the anchor as soon as it hits bottom then the blade shape takes over. Unlike the Rockna, the Mantus has extensions or ears that stick out to hold the roll bar. These ears apply further force on the blade tip to get it to dig-in instantly. This and the ability to retrieve a fouled anchor with a grappling hook , price and warranty made it our choice for purchase and evaluation. The Mantus comes with “some assembly required”  but it is so straightforward that instructions are not necessary and all parts are supplied. It takes all of 15 minutes to bolt it all together. While this had initially been a concern, the bolts are massive. We also opted for a slightly over-sized 65 lb model although we could have gone with a 45. We chose the larger size as it enabled us elite place the existing secondary 45 Danforth with chain by a Fortress stowed in a cockpit locker thus saving a net wight of 150lbs from the bow. The 65 is a tight fit (see photo) and may be over-kill, but this whole exercise is about total confidence and sound sleeping at anchor.
To test this, when anchoring, we zoom-in the chart plotter and drop a waypoint exactly where we drop the anchor. If we approach it from the same direction on departure the point should be the same. (The GPS antenna is 40 feet behind the bow so that has to be considered each time when we retrieve it.)
Day 1: Lake Sylvia, Florida -soft mud, little wind, no wave action
Set instantly, held fast absolutely no drag.
Day 2: Dinner  Key, Florida – sand, 10 kt wind, lots of powerboat wake
Set instantly, held fast, no movement
Day 3: Channel Five, Florida Keys – sand, 1 kt current (reversing) 10 kt wind
1 -2 ft seas occasional wake.
Set instantly, held fast, less than 10 ft movement
Day 4: West of Boot Key, Florida- sand, 1kt current, 10 kt wind, 2ft seas but
lots of powerboat wake
Set instantly, held fast, absolutely no movement
Day 6: Key West Channel, hard bottom, 2kt current (reversing) 15-20 kt
wind, 2-3 ft seas and lots of sport fisherman wake. THE BIG TEST;
With wind and tide opposing, this and seas rolling through unabated
from the north; this would be a real trial.
Anchored in 24 feet, we laid 80 feet of 3/8″ chain and another
40ft of 1″ nylon rode (total 130 ft) and greatfully had lots of swing-
room as the fluky tide and assortment of boats in this Harbour creates
mayhem as each one react differently to the high wind and strong
current . Set first time and held fast.
Day 7: Lake Sylvia, Ft Lauderdale hiding from a Cold Front. Mud bottom 10 feet deep crowded anchorage. 15 kts SW wind little current. Set instantly.
As wind swung around to NW then NE it picked up to 18-20. We held fast but the 50ft Hatteras beside us dragged slowly into the pilings of a private residence. Just as it reached the piling, we got a line on the bow and hauled her back into the anchorage but now the Mantus would need to hold our 44 ft sailboat and a 50 ft Hatteras with lots of windage AND tonnage. We called TowBoat US in case we couldn’t save her but there was no need! The Mantus held us both without dragging at all in the soupy bottom! We’ll be talking to the owner about upgrading to an anchor that HOLDS. The damage avoided today will easily pay for a stainless steel model. Well done Mantus!
Captain Bradd Wilson
S/V Sampatecho II
Beneteau 440

Mantus Chain Hook is a Great Solution

Gear Review: Mantus Chain Hook

 By Barrie, S/V Alchemy

 Since I came across it when researching anchors. I have been coveting the Mantus Chain Hook. A simple design, it seemed to solve all the problems of falling off, yet still be easy to take off during setting and retrieval. We were fortunate enough to get our hands on one for testing at the end of this last sailing season.

We were provided with the full bridle version. This has the Mantus Chain Hook, and two 25′ lengths of three strand nylon to serve as a bridle. Once you have the hook in your hands, the immediate response is “bloody hell it’s big!” It’s much larger than a simple chain hook, mainly, I suspect, because of the clever channel in it to hold the chain. I did have some worries about whether it would be hard to hook on, or interfere with our roller, but it was no easier or harder than our regular hook. Any amount of deliberate thrashing around of the chain couldn’t make it fall off.

I was also impressed by the bridle that is provided with the chain hook. I have found a bridle that uses two ropes essential in reducing the swing while at anchor. The triangle that is formed by cleating off to points 2-3′ apart at the bow naturally causes swinging to pull on one side or the other providing a turning moment that straightens the boat up. The thought that in a strong direct wind you have double the security and strength is a welcome one.

The bottom line so far is that the Mantus Chain Hook as been a great solution to the typical problems of a simpler chain hook. Simple, easy to use and effective. I would heartily recommend one.

Full review can be found here at Barrie’s Sailing With Kids blog:

S/V Vacilando – this anchor set EVERY. SINGLE. TIME!

Hi Folks~
I bought a 45 lb. Mantus and have used it as my primary anchor. We did a portion of the ICW from Georgia to Norfolk and anchored out most of the nights. Let me tell you something, this anchor set EVERY. SINGLE. TIME! Fast and deep. In Georgia and South Carolina we saw currents over 4 knots at some points. We had reversing currents with opposing wind and at one point we had to anchor in Whiteside Creek off of Dewey’s Inlet due to some serious weather building. Whiteside is not protected by anything other than a small bluff with trees on it. The wind built to 25 knots fast and there wasn’t too much room for error due to the grass sticking up out of the water on either side of the small creek. It was the only time I “worried” about the anchor setting and holding. I tell you, we didn’t have a single issue. It set and held all night long.
My wife and I live full-time and travel on our 35 ft. Cal sailboat… and I can say, the only thing I hate about this anchor is pulling it up in the morning. If you’re looking for a roll-bar type anchor, you should definitely put them on your list.
Chris D.
s/v Vacilando

MANTUS HOOK GETS TESTED

We just finished coming up the ICW and after many, many nights of anchoring I had tried all kinds of different ways to connect the chain to the bridle. I tried hooks, shackles, rolling hitches, etc. All had their shortcomings. Took too long to install / remove, fell off, etc. Then I found the Mantus chain hook. What a beauty in simplicity! Easy to install on the chain and easy to remove. Literally only takes seconds. The Mantus hook never fell off, even when it lay in mud all night. I could not be happier with this purchase. If you’re looking for the perfect chain hook, check out the Mantus.
Sid at Sailaway, 2001 Lagoon 410

http://www.multihulls4us.com/forums/showthread.php?p=60029&posted=1#post60029

“Life is great in the Virgin Islands”

We have been using the new bridle, hook and carabiner for about two weeks now.
As usual the anchor is working great, since removing the swivel I hook up on the first try every time. We have had unusually high wind here this past week and the anchor has worked great.
Now that Deb is here I have a second set of hands to help me out when anchoring and picking up mooring ball. I typically drive the boat and she handles the bow work. She is really pretty new to sailing and definitely new to working on a 44 foot catamaran. The new bridle and attachments have been VERY easy for her to use. She looks like a pro on the bow that has been doing it for a lot longer than she has. She hasn’t even chipped a nail yet.
Thanks again for making a quality product!
Steve
www.usvicatamaran.com

set EVERY TIME… grass… sand …currents & storms

A few months ago I purchased a 35lb Mantus anchor for my Endeavour cat 30 sailboat to go with a new windless. I just returned from 2 months cruising the Bahamas. I have sailed for over 30 years and used many brands of anchors.
No anchor I have ever used before has set EVERY TIME, in every type bottom, on the first pull except the Mantus. In the heavy grass I always dive to check the set. The Mantus set perfectly every time with only the “roll bar” showing. Heavy tidal currents and midnight storms all failed to unset it.
Friends I was cruising with would dive their anchors then look at mine and could not believe it. No other anchor even comes close!!!
Vaughan Weaver PE,
LCDR USN Ret.

More from S/V Jacasso

Update we are now in Luperon DR and Monte loves the Luperon Mud! We have some very gusty winds during the day and so far in the last week 2 boats have had their anchors fail and one mooring ball broke loose. We just sit here comfortably knowing that the Mantus is set and we are going nowhere! Thanks again..
John Young
S/V Jacasso

John Young S/V Jacasso

Hi Greg,
We are in Georgetown Bahamas and headed for the Turks and Caicos tomorrow, just wanted to update that we LOVE THE ANCHOR and have named it Monte! Monte digs in hard every time we stop. We have not dragged once since we left Key west over a month ago and have anchored out all but about 5 days in some pretty tough conditions including a sleepless night at Allen Cay in the Exumas when the wind shifted from E to W and we knew Monte could not hold but he did.. We did have one instance where I let the chain out to fast and it got wrapped around the shank of the anchor and it never set but that was my fault! Anyway the Anchor, the Combo tool, the Chain hook and the bottle opener are all working perfectly for us.

Thanks for the great product,

John Young
S/V Jacasso

Letter from Peter L Littmann

I have been living on my Pacific Seacraft Orion 27 since Nov. 2011 I started from Cambride, MD , spent the first winter in Farendena, FL. Went back north as far as Washington,NC. proceeded south to Southport NC. I left Southport June 22 2012 arrived at Clearlake TX August 25 2012 and was hit by a Searay speed boat 2 hours after arriving. I have lived on the hook all but 9 days of that time. I have a Rocna 10 kilo and a Rocna 15 kilo that is presently my primary anchor, I have been very happy with them up to this point. We were having easterly wind of sustained 15 to 20 knots with gusts of up to 35 knots. When I noticed that I was draging down wind at a very slow rate of under 1 knot. My primary has never done that with all the varied bottoms that I encountered traveling the ICW from Southport around the Keys to Clearlake. I pulled the anchor and noticed that it hadn’t completely burried itself having the rollbar showing the upper third clean of mud. I have an all chain rode of 5/16 ” g4 and always set my anchor by backing down at 2300 rpms on the 2Qm15 Yanmar engine that is in Thalassa. I have been doing my own tests with a Mantus 8lb that I purchased at Boaters resale. I do admit that my testing is a little ruthless but I have no time in my life for fabicated truth. I have had the Mantus taking all the strain for the past 2 weeks on Clearlake with 12 feet of 1/4 chain and 3/8″ rode of about 15 meters. I have reset the anchor every other day from my dinghy, and am very pleased with the holding as well as the retrieval. It sets quickly, holds fast and can be retrieved with the dinghy. It has come to the surface with no mud clogged on the fluke but once, and that time there was only about 20% of the fluke covered, witch was easily cleared with a few dunks in the water. The performance has been as good or better than my 16.5 lb claw anchor that I have to retrieve with Thaalassa, not being able to pull it out of the bottom with the dinghy. Clearlake has got a top cover of pudding mud that covers really hard mud. I will be leaving for North Carolina within the month after I redo the standing rigging on Thalassa, I have an old master fiberglass craftsman that I have worked with in North Carolina and will take Thalassa there to have the job done properly.

Letter from DAVE BOLDUC

Just to let you know that the Mantus 8/9 pound anchor is doing great on my Bahamas cruise. Since l sailed over here in my 12 foot boat, I could only carry one anchor and I’m glad I choose your product. As advertised it sets quickly and holds well in many bottom types.  Of course the little boat gets a lot of attention and people also ask about my ground tackle which I’m happy to show them since I’m often in the shallows or dried out in the flats. Well keep up the good work.

Dave Bolduc
Exumas, Bahamas

IMG_6382 (1)

MANTUS PROVES ITSELF AGAIN:

“..this was my second time anchoring with my new Mantus anchor, and wow, once again it was pretty incredible… this captain is super happy with the holding power of his anchor!”
Full story: Perfect trip to Friday Harbor and Mantus proves itself again
-Brian W.
S/V Aeolus

Cruising World Review:

Anchor Away
Created by a cruising sailor frustrated by the performance of traditional ground tackle, the Mantus anchor—available in galvanized or stainless-steel models—is a high-performance, “new generation” anchor especially designed to set and hold in hard or grassy bottoms. Formulated with steel plate and no cast parts (the shank and shank boot are welded from top to bottom, and the shank and roll bar are bolted to the fluke), the anchor’s “nose” is reinforced for extra strength, and every Mantus comes with a lifetime guarantee.
$90 to $940 (galvanized models), (855) 262-6887, www.mantusanchors.com

http://www.cruisingworld.com/gear/hardware/aprils-new-products

Mantus Review

Mantus passes first test on trip to Blake Island

For a full story: http://gulf32aeolus.blogspot.com/2013/01/mantus-passes-first-test-on-trip-to.html

“When we pulled up to about 1:1 the windlass actually bogged down a bit and had a moment of struggle to free the Mantus from the seabed. Let me tell you something, that never happened with our CQR. And our windlass is a 1000W Lofrans Tigres. A really beautiful beast”

“So the Mantus set right away into a mud/sand bottom, held the boat firm when tugged back, and then was a bit hard to pull out with our windlass until we were really 1:1. I would say that is great news for this anchor and I am excited about giving some more work in the months ahead”

Mantus Chain Grabber review from S/V Felix!

We love our new 3/8″ Mantis Hook! We have been sailing our 45′ Prout catamaran to the Bahamas for the last 3 years.
We have tended to anchor out rather than do the marinas to save on the cruising fund.
One constant issue with a catamaran is that one must deploy a bridle that extends 10-12′ from the bows to keep the vessel from wandering at anchor. Since we draw only 4′ the bridle sometime winds up laying on the bottom. If the wind and current slack and we have anchored in less than 12′.. more like 6′ or 7 ‘ … the standard chain hook often falls off once it rests on the bottom.
Not so with the Mantis Hook !
It holds on and I sleep better and so does the Admiral!
Greatefully noted-
Capt. Dave andChris O’Neill
S/V Felix

Mantus takes on Hurricane Sandy & Wins!

“The primary anchor, the Mantus, did very well.  It didn’t budge much at all, just enough for it to dig in so deep that the very top of the rollbar was 6 inches below the surface, which I believe was only about 2 feet of drag.  The in tandum anchor chain still had its 10+ feet of slack so that means the Mantus never dragged.  It did rotate when the winds rotated as it was pointing 120 degrees different direction from how it was set.  All in all, it passed a very tough test.  70 knots gusting to 80 knots and it didn’t drag but 2 feet….awesome!” – Franklin Gray reports from Bahamas

full blog post here: Dreamboat and it’s crazy Captain

Dream Boat and its crazy Captain

This is the Mantus anchor which I have grown to love…not much left to see huh?  It’s really dug in.  I’ve ridden solely on both anchors in winds over 50 knots so I know they are both very good anchors and set very well.  You can’t buy a new Bulwagga anymore so I’d recommend the Mantus over any other anchor on the market.  From what I can tell, the extra weight on the tip and the expanded rollbar really help the tip dig in immediately

Franklin Gray

Charter Boat Captain comments on his Mantus

“Just wanted to post a quick endorsement of Mantus Anchors.
I have a 44 foot Voyage Catamaran, it had a 55lb Delta. I am a charter boat Captain current’y doing charters in the galveston Bay area but am heading to the Virgin Islands this fall. The Delta worked ok, but I wanted an anchor that I would not have to think about. While catering to a boat full of guests the last thing I want to worry about is whether my anchor is going to drag in the middle of the night. On my prior boat I had a Manson Supreme which worked great, I was planning on buying one of them until I came across the Mantus at a local boat show. I decided to get the 85lb, I wanted to sleep well. I had problems getting this anchor to fit on my bow roller, after some discussions with Mantus we traded it for the smaller 65lb anchor. This fits perfectly.
I first used the anchor this past Labor Day weekend. The first night there was little wind and figured we would not have a problem dragging, what stood out in my mind was that when we backed down to set the anchor it hooked up so well that it almost jerked one of the guys off the boat. The bottom in Galveston Bay is mud, thick mud, usually when the anchor is pulled up it is completely covered, the Mantus shed most of this mud.
The second and third night were spend at another anchorage, lots more wind and we actually had a 180 wind shift and then a shift back to the original direction over a few hours. I happened to be on the boat while this happened and we never were anywhere close to pulling the anchor loose. I did watch a few other boats drag.
Although I haven’t used the Mantus all that much yet I am please with my purchase, it took a lot of convincing to not go with a Manson Supreme but I am happy that I did.
If you have any questions you can contact me directly.
Captain Steve Schlosser
S/V Alternate Latitude
usvicatamaran.com

Letter from Brian, Sailing an Alberg on The Great Lakes.

Just returned from a cruise with 2 of the boats equipped with Mantus
anchors. Flawless performance (as expected), including a night in high winds anchored in a cove off an old sawmill where the lake bottom was amix of waterlogged pine tree bark chips and grey clay. Not the best for holding, as the bark chips (pieces mostly around 2″ X 6″) tend to block the flukes of Danforth and Bruce types, requiring multiple setting attempts. Mantus bites immediately. I normally go for a swim to check the set, but in this case the dark tannin in the water prevents a visual check… a little stressful in bad weather.
I’ve just placed an order for another two Mantus anchors, officially retiring the two other anchors we carry aboard. No sense lugging around obsolete ground tackle.

Thanks!
Brian, Sailing an Alberg on The Great Lakes.

Letter From Phil Geren Past Vice Commodore Texas Mariners Cruising Association

The latest anchoring research indicates that the venerable articulated shank plow (CQR) and double fluke (Danforth) types of anchors are not roll stable, i.e. they often pull out when wind direction changes. Conversely, the non-articulated, fixed shank types such as Mantus, Delta, and Spade are roll stable. As I am preparing for long distance coastwise cruising beginning in October, this prompted me to abandon my big CQR and get a 35lb Mantus for my trawler.
Wow!
I love the Mantus. Sets for me quickly every time in all bottoms, including sand, grass, soft mud, clay, and has held beautifully in all these holding grounds.
I am totally sold on the Mantus design and quality.
Phil Geren
Past Vice Commodore
Texas Mariners Cruising Association

Brad Ingram

It’s working great. It digs in very quickly. I have used it in mud and soft sand.
The soft sand was at Ship Island in MS. The anchorage was partially exposed
overnight and the wind increased to 20 knots. I’m going on a week and half long trip
two weeks from now. I’ll reference my log after and give you a detailed report. We
will be anchoring every night thanks to my shoal draft capabilities!

A Letter from Brian

Hi Greg;

Just received your 13lb. Being very curious how you got your design to set in hard packed sand (where others fail), I had to try it right away in our yard. It did indeed set, well done! It seems that you have perfected the chisel point, a little different than both our Rocna and Manson.

I have to admit I’m a bit of an anchor buff, and have about 30 anchors in our boat house, and I love to photograph them under water to see how they perform. We have been sailing on Georgian Bay since ’65 (part of Lake Huron, one of the Great Lakes), where the sea bed is often a combination of weed, rock, gravel, mud, and sometimes sand (and old logs too left over from the days of logging the area).

You should think about a simple knock down design with perhaps one shank bolt and welded tabs the shank foot slides into, it would be great for those who want to stow it in pieces and need quicker deployment.

Again, great job, thanks!
Brian.

Penner Web Design and Mantus

Mantus Anchors invited me down to the South West International Boat Show this weekend to help them out with their booth and enjoy a little bit of Texas.

I had a great time.  I created the Mantus Anchors iPad app which turned… Read the rest here.

Dreamboat and it’s crazy Captain

The first weekend came where we didn’t have to do anything and it was going to be relaxing, but oh no, bitch nature had something to say about that.  The past 36 hours it’s been blowing hard.  A guy came by and tried talking my Captain into moving to a mooring saying the holding here is only a few inches of “stuff” on top of limestone.  Well, my Captain wouldn’t have anything of it, but he did deploy his second anchor just in case.  Good thing because I hate dragging my anchor.

The two anchors he has out now are the Bullwagga and the Mantus.  Both are new style anchors but the Bullwagga maker is out of business.  Captain loves the Bullwagga but for some reason, this storm seems to be mostly riding on the Mantus and it’s doing quite well.  It’s our first time using this anchor so it’s good to know she can handle her own.  Winds at times were reach 40 knots but mostly in the range of 25 knots.

This anchorage has a problem with strong currents and due to the fact that there isn’t good protection all the way around in any anchorage and many stories around about “the last storm” that I think the Captain is going to head to Marithon soon as they have a very good mooring field that is protected in all directions…. Read the rest here